Quick Science: Cohesion Pepper

Cohesion is a property of liquids. Water is very cohesive, it sticks to itself.

I like using a cohesion activity when a group of students needs to learn to work in teams. This can lead to a discussion about being a cohesive group.

Click on the link for this post to read more and find a link to a free product at my TpT store that includes a take home activity and a dozen copyright free images you can use to introduce this topic.

Quick Science: What’s the Point?

Got two sharp pencils? That’s all this quick science activity requires.

A great option when you want to introduce perspective and how we see objects, have just a few minutes of class time, or would like to add an activity to your sub folder.

I’ve included resources for these additional options. Use clever images to show forced perspective. Start a discussion about perspective and seeing from another person’s viewpoint. Talk about adapting to vision loss in one eye.

Quick Science: Where’s Your Blind Spot?

Are you teaching light or optics in your physics class or point of view and showing respect towards others during a class discussion? This activity may be just what you need!

What does it mean to have a blind spot?

Why is it important to be aware of your own blind spots?

This activity easily extends from primary grades to high school…

Quick Science: Bernoulli’s Principle #3

Another fun demonstration to add to a science unit, use for a science night, or show students just for fun. No prep time or materials? Use the videos at the end of this post to prompt a conversation about science! Depending on the age of your students this could be demonstrated by a small team of capable students. All you need is two balloons of the same size, about a meter of string, and a drinking straw. The materials are so common students will be able to repeat the activity at home.  🙂     Inflate two balloons to the same size. Tie …

Quick Science: Bernoulli’s Principle #2

Need a quick thought provoking demonstration that inspires a conversation in your classroom? Perhaps another activity to demonstrate air pressure that will enrich your weather or physics unit? All you’ll need is a wooden spool, an index card, and a thumbtack. Take a deep breath and exhale slowly to show students the power of air or let Dr. Boyd F Edwards demonstrate it for you! Trim a 3” x 5” index card in half to create a 3” x 2.5” card. Push a tack into the center of the card.    Place the point of the tack into the tube in the center  of a wooden …