Quick Science: Bernoulli’s Principle #3

Another fun demonstration to add to a science unit, use for a science night, or show students just for fun. No prep time or materials? Use the videos at the end of this post to prompt a conversation about science! Depending on the age of your students this could be demonstrated by a small team of capable students. All you need is two balloons of the same size, about a meter of string, and a drinking straw. The materials are so common students will be able to repeat the activity at home.  🙂     Inflate two balloons to the same size. Tie …

Quick Science: Bernoulli’s Principle #2

Need a quick thought provoking demonstration that inspires a conversation in your classroom? Perhaps another activity to demonstrate air pressure that will enrich your weather or physics unit? All you’ll need is a wooden spool, an index card, and a thumbtack. Take a deep breath and exhale slowly to show students the power of air or let Dr. Boyd F Edwards demonstrate it for you! Trim a 3” x 5” index card in half to create a 3” x 2.5” card. Push a tack into the center of the card.    Place the point of the tack into the tube in the center  of a wooden …

Quick Science: Bernoulli’s Principle #1

It’s April, almost May. Need a quick activity to punch up the enthusiasm in your science class? This activity could be part of a weather unit with air and wind. It could be added to a physics unit about force and air pressure. It’s a great demonstration that students can share with family members at a science night or open house. Turn on the hair dryer and aim the flow of air up. Carefully balance a ping-pong ball in the stream of air. Gently tilt the hair dryer. How far can you tilt the hair dryer before the ball falls …

Quick Science: Videos

I’ve just posted a couple of comprehensive products with Resources for teaching Force and Newton’s Laws. I wanted to share an amazing resource I added to the Newton’s Laws web page – sixteen short videos posted by NASA that you’ll want to show your students. Each video introduces a common toy and demonstrates how it’s used on Earth and then on the International Space Station. Choose a video to introduce a toy. Pause and challenge your students to predict how the toy will behave on the space station. After a conversation show the rest of the video. Consider turning off the audio the first time to avoid the explanation giving away too …

Quick Science: Toothpick Stars and Toothpick Puzzles

Need a few simple activities you can use if a lesson ends sooner than expected or when students have been really focused in class and have earned a fun reward? I’ve posted two products that use simple materials in my Teacher Pay Teacher stores: Simply Science and Simply Math. Use flat toothpicks and water to create Toothpick Stars. Several videos let you see the activity before you present it to students.   Arrange and then rearrange toothpicks to solve Toothpick Puzzles. Use small or full page images or a PowerPoint™ presentation to display the thirty-two different puzzles. Arrange and then rearrange flat …

Quick Science: Spinning Illusions

Use an optical illusion to extend your light or five senses unit. Print in color or have students color the images. Tape the paper to a pencil or straw, staple, and spin! Step-by-step directions and a short video make it easy to create a spinning illusion your students will love. Kids may want to draw their own illusions to share with classmates and family members. Does it matter if you spin slowly or quickly? What if you use dark colors, bright colors, or pale colors? Will you see the illusion better if you are close, holding it at arm’s length, or far …

Quick Science: Optical Illusions

  Extend your unit on light into a study of optical illusions. Your visual kids will love it and your more capable or interested kids can be challenged to create new illusions. Here are a few resources to make it easy to add optical illusions to your science class. Optics 4 Kids – The Optical Society for great resources – Check out their activities! Easy Activities explore the basic concepts of light and color, suitable for five and older Medium Activities are recommended for scientists ten and older Advanced Activities are suggested for scientists fifteen and older Examples of Optical Illusions from …

Quick Science: Walk through Paper

Do you have a pile of scrap paper, scissors, and a few minutes for a quick science demonstration? Challenge students to figure out a way to walk through the paper. If you have any students familiar with the activity caution them to explain after the demonstration. They might have a variation to share like a spiral cut or be able to help classmates with the activity! Fold a sheet of paper in half along the dashed line and then make the vertical cuts along the solid lines. Cut the center section of the fold itself along the heavy solid line. …

Short Can Be Great!

A science lesson doesn’t have to take 40 minutes or even several sessions of 40 minutes. It needs to be focused on the science you’re presenting, be interesting, and, of course, be fun! I’m teaching inertia and gravity in a fifth grade classroom. Between my 40 minute classes I want to keep students interested and talking about the topic. I could use a few short demonstrations to review or reinforce inertia and gravity. Do you have a meter stick? Try this Center of Gravity demonstration. Do you have a large glob of clay to add to the meter stick? Try this Balancing …