Quick Science: What’s the Point?

Got two sharp pencils? That’s all this quick science activity requires.

A great option when you want to introduce perspective and how we see objects, have just a few minutes of class time, or would like to add an activity to your sub folder.

I’ve included resources for these additional options. Use clever images to show forced perspective. Start a discussion about perspective and seeing from another person’s viewpoint. Talk about adapting to vision loss in one eye.

Quick Science: Where’s Your Blind Spot?

Are you teaching light or optics in your physics class or point of view and showing respect towards others during a class discussion? This activity may be just what you need!

What does it mean to have a blind spot?

Why is it important to be aware of your own blind spots?

This activity easily extends from primary grades to high school…

Quick Science: Bernoulli’s Principle #3

Another fun demonstration to add to a science unit, use for a science night, or show students just for fun. No prep time or materials? Use the videos at the end of this post to prompt a conversation about science! Depending on the age of your students this could be demonstrated by a small team of capable students. All you need is two balloons of the same size, about a meter of string, and a drinking straw. The materials are so common students will be able to repeat the activity at home.  🙂     Inflate two balloons to the same size. Tie …

Quick Science: Bernoulli’s Principle #2

Need a quick thought provoking demonstration that inspires a conversation in your classroom? Perhaps another activity to demonstrate air pressure that will enrich your weather or physics unit? All you’ll need is a wooden spool, an index card, and a thumbtack. Take a deep breath and exhale slowly to show students the power of air or let Dr. Boyd F Edwards demonstrate it for you! Trim a 3” x 5” index card in half to create a 3” x 2.5” card. Push a tack into the center of the card.    Place the point of the tack into the tube in the center  of a wooden …

Quick Science: Bernoulli’s Principle #1

It’s April, almost May. Need a quick activity to punch up the enthusiasm in your science class? This activity could be part of a weather unit with air and wind. It could be added to a physics unit about force and air pressure. It’s a great demonstration that students can share with family members at a science night or open house.   Turn on the hair dryer and aim the flow of air up. Carefully balance a ping-pong ball in the stream of air. Gently tilt the hair dryer. How far can you tilt the hair dryer before the ball …

Quick Science: Toothpick Stars and Toothpick Puzzles

Need a few simple activities you can use if a lesson ends sooner than expected or when students have been really focused in class and have earned a fun reward? I’ve posted two products that use simple materials in my Teacher Pay Teacher stores: Simply Science and Simply Math. Use flat toothpicks and water to create Toothpick Stars. Several videos let you see the activity before you present it to students.   Arrange and then rearrange toothpicks to solve Toothpick Puzzles. Use small or full page images or a PowerPoint™ presentation to display the thirty-two different puzzles. Arrange and then rearrange flat …

Quick Science: Spinning Illusions

Use an optical illusion to extend your light or five senses unit. Print in color or have students color the images. Tape the paper to a pencil or straw, staple, and spin! Step-by-step directions and a short video make it easy to create a spinning illusion your students will love. Kids may want to draw their own illusions to share with classmates and family members. Does it matter if you spin slowly or quickly? What if you use dark colors, bright colors, or pale colors? Will you see the illusion better if you are close, holding it at arm’s length, or far …