Do you need a few free seek-a-word puzzles?

A fun way to help students learn how to spell science terms is with seek-a-word puzzles. To get you started, try these FREE WORD PUZZLES from my Simply Science store, including: five senses people make sounds animals make sounds weather volcanoes layers of the Earth butterflies cells bones muscles circulatory system   I’m still adding seek-a-word puzzles so check back often to see what’s new in my store. Let me know if you have a topic (and a list of terms) that you want me to add to the Simply Science store. To create your own puzzles, visit Discovery Education where you’ll find an easy puzzle maker. …

Poetry about Motion

Here is a list of poetry by Shel Silverstein to consider adding to your resources for teaching about force and motion unit. These could support activities that meet NGSS 3-PS2-1♦ and 3-PS2-2◊. A Light in the Attic, Shel Silverstein force: “ADVENTURES OF A FRISBEE” inertia: “FANCY DIVE” pendulums: “HOW TO MAKE A SWING WITH NO ROPE OR BOARD OR NAILS” Every Thing On It, Shel Silverstein gravity: “THE JUGGLER” gravity: “TURNING INTO” gravity: “GOOD IDEA” gravity: “LOVE IS GRAND BUT…” Falling Up, Shel Silverstein buoyancy: “SOMETHIN’ NEW” gravity: “FALLING UP” Where the Sidewalk Ends, Shel Silverstein buoyancy: “HOMEMADE BOAT” friction: “MAGICAL ERASER” …

Poetry and Science Can be a Great Combination

There are many fun poems you can use to enrich science with language arts. You might have students illustrate a poem you’ve found, choose one to share with classmates or family members, or write a new poem that can be shared with all future classes – kids love thinking their work will be added to your resources and used again and again as you teach the topic. In future posts, I’ll share poems I found written by familiar poets like Jack Prelutsky, Jeff Moss, and Shel Silverstein that you can use to teach topics like force, motion, light, and sound. You might also find these resources useful: Ten …

Need Even More Time for Science?

Who doesn’t need more time? There are many ways to integrate science and writing. Obviously, read and answer questions. OK, describe how to do an experiment and write an analysis of the results. Sure, but can science be used to encourage reluctant writers? You bet it can! I’ve had more than one student tell me they’re working to be better at math and writing because that’s what scientists do. Some students respond when there’s a reason to write clearly and solve math problems correctly. Here’s a few suggestions for integrating writing and science: Writing Clear Directions for making a peanut butter and …